Columnists / OP-ED

Eric Wiechmann

Tips on Arbitration Advocacy, Part II

By ERIC WIECHMANN |

One of the most important steps in ensuring an effective arbitration is to be fully prepared for the preliminary hearing that will be held by the arbitrators soon after they have been appointed.

Court Time Is Valuable — Don't Waste It

By Alexander J. Cuda and Yakov Pyetranker |

Connecticut's courts have long recognized the legal maxim that justice delayed is justice denied.

Eric Wiechmann

Suggestions for Effective Arbitration Advocacy, Part I

By ERIC WIECHMANN |

There is usually ample flexibility in working with the arbitrator in establishing an efficient process.

Dubois-Mark

Handicapping Disciplinary Cases

At best, handicapping our Supreme Court is an inexact science, but if several recent cases give any indication, I think the pendulum there is swinging in favor of attorneys in discipline matters.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Protecting Clients Through Joint Defense and Common Interest Agreements

By J. Randolph Evans and Shari L. Klevens, Dentons |

In many situations, co-defendants to a litigation may find that their interests are aligned and that they share a common goal: defeating the plaintiff's claims.

Mark Dubois

Normalizing the Normal

By Mark Dubois |

I was reading an article in the New York Times a few days ago about how the death of Prince, without a will, highlighted the importance of estate planning. The story did an OK job of explaining how the laws of different jurisdictions make some things tricky and explained the consequences of doing things wrong. What was missing was any suggestion that folks should talk to a lawyer.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Litigating Debt Collections May Subject You to Liability

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Enacted in 1977 as an amendment to the Consumer Credit Protection Act, the FDCPA bans a "debt collector" from engaging in deceptive and abusive debt collection practices.

Mark Dubois

Attorney's Imprisonment Should Serve as Lesson

By MARK DUBOIS |

Attorney Corey Brinson is going to prison, and that's a shame.

Harry Mazadoorian

Quinnipiac and Bar Association Event Knocks It Out of the Park

By By HARRY MAZADOORIAN |

Increasingly sophisticated and readily available early processes have proven themselves to be highly effective, but they need to be further developed and refined in both the administrative and legislative arenas.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Who Can Sue Independent Counsel?

By J. RANDOLPH EVANS and SHARI L. KLEVENS |

When disputes arise out of an attorney's handling of a legal matter, the parties involved are generally the attorney and the client. It is a basic concept that attorneys are only liable to their clients for their errors and omissions. But, as is the case with most rules, there can be gray areas.

Mark Dubois

Judging the Judges

By MARK DUBOIS |

When testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Neil Gorsuch pointed out that judges are supposed to be more than politicians wearing robes. Amen to that. Unfortunately, in most of the country, where trial and appellate judges and justices are elected, too many times they are just that.

Harry Mazadoorian

Connecticut Must Adopt Revised Arbitration Law

By By Harry N. Mazadoorian |

It's time to bring our state arbitration act to the next level and the RUAA provides the mechanism to do that.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Enforceable and Effective Attorney-Client Agreements

By J. RANDOLPH EVANS AND SHARI L. KLEVENS |
Mark Dubois

Jacoby & Meyers Case—Not Only Unsuccessful but Moot, Too

By MARK DUBOIS |

The Second Circuit just put to rest Jacoby & Meyers' lawsuit challenging New York's prohibition in Rule 5.4 on nonlawyer investment in law firms. It's not surprising, as the challenge seemed fatally flawed in some respects

Harry Mazadoorian

On Broadway Now, an Early Arbitration Fan

How ironic it is, in light of Hamilton's support for arbitration, that the final controversy in his life was resolved by a much more permanent and lethal form of dispute resolution.

Mark Dubois

It May Be Wrong, But Is It Unethical?

Readers and colleagues have also reached out to me about allegedly false statements made by James Comey, Rudy Giuliani, Jeff Sessions and others, wondering if there might be some disciplinary consequences. The common thread in all of the discussions is whether lawyers should be held to a higher standard than others when engaging in public speech, and whether the disciplinary process is the proper place to police misconduct of this nature.

Isaac Lidsky, corporate speaker, author, entrepreneur and the only blind person to serve as a law clerk for the U.S. Supreme Court

With ‘Eyes Wide Open,’ Blind Lawyer Recounts SCOTUS Clerkship, Unhappy Law Firm Life

By Tony Mauro |

Isaac Lidsky, who in 2008 became the first blind U.S. Supreme Court law clerk, writes in a new memoir that working for a Big Law firm after his clerkship felt like trading in a “legal joyride” for a job as a corporate chauffeur.

Mark Dubois

There's More to Winding Down Than Turning Off the Lights

There are few institutional supports for aging lawyers. I remember getting calls from senior lawyers when I was chief disciplinary counsel asking me to appoint a trustee to take over their practice and wind it up. I had to explain that trustees are few and far between.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Additional Tips for Working With 'Contract' Attorneys

By J. RANDOLPH EVANS and SHARI L. KLEVENS |

Law firms cannot assume that legal malpractice insurers will specifically ask in an insurance application about the law firm’s use of contract attorneys and provide appropriate coverage. Thus, if law firms do not proactively address insurance coverage for contract attorneys, they can leave themselves open to risk.

Mark Dubois

No Lie: Ethics Rules on 'Pretexting' Vary

Sometimes best intentions lead to bad results. There is a celebrated case where a state’s attorney pretended to be a public defender in order to get a barricaded murderer to agree to surrender himself without the loss of his life or others’. Despite feeling bad about it, the court disciplined him. Rules are rules.