A court can possess long-arm jurisdiction over an individual who resides in another state and who allegedly engages in numerous alleged tortious activities to the claimed injury of property in Connecticut and engages in business transactions in Connecticut. Plaintiff Michael Maisel sued Stuart Snyder and Snyder's children, alleging that Snyder, who owned 50 percent of S & D Development LLC, wrongly took funds from the company's bank account and transferred them to his children, after he changed the mailing address for banking information to his Connecticut address and withheld bank statements. S & D Development is a New Jersey company that has a Connecticut bank account. The defendants moved to dismiss and argued that the court lacked jurisdiction over Snyder's children, some of whom do not reside in Connecticut. The court found it possessed long-arm jurisdiction over Brett Snyder, because he allegedly traveled to Connecticut to participate in tortious conduct, took title to a powerboat purchased with $51,441 in S & D Development funds, registered the powerboat with the Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles, used the powerboat in Connecticut and had a Connecticut telephone number. "Brett," wrote the court, "has engaged in alleged tortious activities both within and without Connecticut to the injury of property in Connecticut and has engaged in business transactions within Connecticut." The court's jurisdiction over Brett complies with due process. Brett has multiple contacts with Connecticut. The court found it also possessed long-arm jurisdiction over Brittany Snyder, because she allegedly worked at S & D Development, has a Connecticut driver's license, travels to Connecticut frequently, has a Connecticut telephone number and filed 2011 tax returns in Connecticut. "Brittany," wrote the court, "has engaged in numerous alleged tortious activities to the claimed injury of property in Connecticut and business transactions within Connecticut." Jurisdiction over Brittany complies with due process. Brittany has many contacts with Connecticut. The court found it possessed long-arm jurisdiction over Cameron Snyder, because he allegedly lives at his father's residence in Connecticut, has a Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles identification card and has a Connecticut bank account. The court denied the defendant children's motion to dismiss. 

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