When a law firm admits it breached the legal standard of care and is responsible to pay the damages its former client would have won, if not for the breach, a court can rule on the claims for damages of the law firm's former client. Allegedly, the plaintiff, Joan Pite, was walking on North Trail in Stratford, Conn., which has no sidewalks, and as she approached an intersection, she observed that a motor vehicle was making a left turn, and she moved to the left, to provide space for the motor vehicle, Pite allegedly stepped on an uneven slope and fell. Pictures established that the slope was very steep. The plaintiff hired the law firm of Jacobs, Grudberg, Belt & Dow to represent her. The plaintiff's suit was dismissed, because the law firm's legal notice to the Town of Stratford allegedly was deficient. The law firm of Jacobs, Grudberg allegedly admitted it breached the legal standard of care and is responsible to pay the damages that the plaintiff presumably would have won, if the legal notice had not been deficient. The court found that a highway defect constituted the sole proximate cause of the plaintiff's fall and that the Town of Stratford possessed constructive notice of the defect. The plaintiff broke a bone and required an operative procedure. The court found that the plaintiff was entitled to economic damages in the amount of $24,138 and non-economic damages in the amount of $15,000.

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