The absence of flyers on election booths, to indicate that there is a referendum question on the ballot, may not violate Connecticut law. Andrew Lockwood filed a complaint, alleging that the City of New London and its employees and agents failed to post explanatory texts for a referendum, in violation of Connecticut General Statutes §9-369b(a). Lockwood also claimed that there were no flyers on the election booths at the polls, to indicate that a referendum question was on the ballot. Connecticut General Statutes §9-369b(a) provides, "Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, any municipality may, by vote of its legislative body, authorize the preparation and printing of concise explanatory texts of local proposals or questions approved for submission to the electors of a municipality at a referendum." The statute adds, "At least three such posters shall be posted at each polling place at which electors will be voting on such proposals or questions."  The State Elections Enforcement Commission found that the city council did not authorize any explanatory texts with respect to the referendum question. Because the city council did not authorize explanatory texts, the city and its employees and agents were not required to post explanatory texts. The absence of flyers on the election booths did not violate current Connecticut law. C.G.S. §§9-369 and 9-369a do not require the placement of flyers on the election booths, to indicate that a referendum question is on the ballot. The State Elections Enforcement Commission dismissed Lockwood's complaint.

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