When each party requests ownership of the marital residence, the court can award the marital residence to the party who has a business that operates out of the residence. The parties married in 1975 and have three children, the youngest of whom is 19 years old and attends Sacred Heart University. The husband, 59, earns $1,206 gross per week as a carpenter and $196 per week from investment income. The husband, who previously owned his own business and also has worked as a supervisor and foreman, claimed that he plans to retire in two or three years and to start his own business. The wife, 59, worked as a homemaker, managed the parties' finances and has her own business, making custom-ordered draperies, curtains and pillows. Currently, the wife's business is not financially successful. The court found that the wife has an earning capacity of $450 per week. The court ordered the husband to pay alimony of $450 per week until the wife's death. The court ordered the husband to maintain life insurance in the amount of $300,000, and to name the wife as the beneficiary, as long as he is obliged to pay alimony. The court ordered the parties to divide equally the college costs of the 19-year-old child, up to the amount of tuition paid by an individual who attends the University of Connecticut. Both parties requested the marital residence in Litchfield. The court awarded the wife the marital residence, because that is the location of her custom-ordered drapery, curtain and pillow business. The court awarded the wife her business. The court awarded the husband a two-family residence in Bantam. The court ordered the parties to divide equally the husband's pension, as of the date that the pension goes into pay status, and that the wife be named as the 100 percent survivor of the pension. The court ordered the parties to hold each other harmless from debt. The court awarded the wife the Ford and the husband the Dodge.

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