An individual who helps a voter with an absentee ballot may be required to provide his name, phone number, address and signature on the absentee ballot, pursuant to Connecticut General Statute §9-140(a). Lynn Brewer filed a complaint and claimed that David LaPoint allegedly sent a partially completed and unexecuted absentee ballot application to her and provided his name, phone number, address and signature on the absentee ballot, as an individual who assisted the complainant. The statute provides, "Any person who assists another person in the completion of an application shall, in the space provided, sign the application and print or type his name, residence address and telephone number." LaPoint, wrote the State Elections Enforcement Commission, "complied with the requirements of §9-140(a) regarding providing the signature and identifying information of an assistor." Lynn Brewer also alleged that David LaPoint omitted the "paid for by" and "approved by" attributions in a postcard that opposed the municipal budget referendum. LaPoint denied that he spent any money in connection with the postcard. Individuals who act alone are not required to include attributions on advocacy communications, in connection with municipal referenda. The State Elections Enforcement Commission found that Brewer failed to prove that LaPoint was responsible for the postcard or that whoever sent the postcard violated C.G.S. §9-621(a), which governs attributions on political advertisements. The State Elections Enforcement Commission dismissed the complaint.

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