In Leak Case, DOJ Considered Reporter 'Co-Conspirator'

, The National Law Journal

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What's being said

  • Harold R. Berk

    CORRECTED:
    1. May 21, 2013 06:51 AM

    DOJ has apparently pumped up a race for the news scoop to claim it as a compromising intelligence disclosure. As reported by the New York Times regarding the A.P. story at the time in May, 2012:

    "The Associated Press, which broke the news Monday afternoon, said that it had uncovered the existence of the bomb last week, but that the White House and the C.I.A. had asked it not to publish the news immediately because the intelligence operation was still under way. Once officials said those concerns had been allayed, The A.P. reported, it decided to disclose the plot despite requests from the Obama administration to wait for an official announcement on Tuesday"

    So it seems the real concern of the Obama Administration was not the disclosure of the secret agent foiling the plot, it was rather who got to make the news report first: A.P. on Monday or the White House on Tuesday. Who got the scoop is hardly a national security issue.

  • Harold R. Berk

    DOJ has apparently pumped up a race for the news scoop to claim it as a compromising intelligence disclosure. As reported by the New York Times regarding the A.P. story at the time in May, 2012:

    "The Associated Press, which broke the news Monday afternoon, said that it had uncovered the existence of the bomb last week, but that the White House and the C.I.A. had asked it not to publish the news immediately because the intelligence operation was still under way. Once officials said those concerns had been allayed, The A.P. reported, it decided to disclose the plot despite requests from the Obama administration to wait for an official announcement on Tuesday"

    So it seems the real concern of the Obama Admisnitation was not the edisclosure of the secret agent foiling the lot it was rather who got to make the news report first: A.P. on Monday or the White House on Tuesday. Who got the scoop is hardly a national security issue.

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