Big Banks Worried About Outside Counsel Who BYOD

, Corporate Counsel

   |1 Comments

Note to Big Law: When you're working with Wall Street, don't Bring Your Own Device. At least not until the devices are configured to secure important data.

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What's being said

  • shawnjohnson

    Like healthcare, banks and law firms have a lot of fear from BYOD and especially with employees using thier own devices. We were looking to bring in a larger MDM system for BYOD at our hospital, but the doctors (who own the hospital) felt it was to intrusive since they all wanted to use their own devices, but didn't want IT to have total control over them. Still, they wanted the ability to send HIPAA compliant patient info (mostly text messages) to admin and other doctors. We changed our stratagy and started looking for individual apps to deal with the various security issues. Example to allow for HIPAA text messaging, we got an app (Tigertext) which is HIPAA compliant, and installed it on all the doctors devices. It auto-deletes the messages after X period of time, and IT can still wipe the device if it is lost or stolen, but the doctors didn't feel it violated thier 'privacy' which made it acceptable to them.

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