A court can find that a party failed to prove fraud in the inducement, fraud and negligent misrepresentation in connection with a prenuptial agreement. Both parties married previously. The parties have a minor child who was born in 2002. Previously, the trial court issued a ruling on the parties' prenuptial agreement. The defendant wife, 48, appealed to the Appellate Court, which held that the prenuptial agreement was not valid. On remand, the husband claimed that the wife spent too much money. The wife maintained that the husband physically restrained her when they argued. The court found the husband at greater fault for the breakdown of the marital relationship. The husband, 68, worked inordinately hard and developed real estate. The husband's assets and income decreased in recent years. The wife filed for bankruptcy during the divorce. The court ordered child support of $192 per week. The court ordered each party to pay 50 percent of the minor child's unreimbursed medical expenses and extracurricular expenses. The court ordered the husband to pay the minor child's college tuition, pursuant to Connecticut General Statutes §46b-56c. The court ordered the husband to maintain life insurance in the amount of $125,000, and to name the wife as the beneficiary, as long as he is required to pay alimony and child support. The court did not award alimony. The court ordered the husband to convey his interest in property to the wife. The court awarded the wife furniture and items in the marital residence, bank accounts and investments and a Jeep. The court awarded the husband his interests in businesses, bank accounts and investments and motor vehicles. The court ordered the husband to hold the wife harmless from debt in connection with the marital residence. The court rejected the husband's claims that the wife owes him money, on behalf of herself and relatives, and that she engaged in fraud in the inducement, fraud and negligent misrepresentation in connection with the prenuptial agreement. The court ordered the husband to pay $25,000 toward the wife's attorneys' fees. The court ordered the parties to divide equally funds held in escrow.

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