In a long-term marriage in which one party earns significantly more than the other, a court can order 15 years of alimony. The parties married in Puerto Rico in 1986 and have five children. Allegedly, the husband vacated the marital residence in or about 2008 and currently resides with a girlfriend. The husband, 45, earns $64,428 gross per year as a full-time bus driver for Connecticut Transit. The wife, 43, earns $27,872 gross per year as a part-time bus driver at First Transit. The court rejected the husband's proposal that he pay alimony of $100 per week until September 2017, because the husband earns significantly more than the wife. The court ordered the husband to pay alimony of $250 per week until the wife's death, marriage or Sept. 30, 2028, whichever takes place first. The court ordered the husband to pay child support of $163 per week. The court kept jurisdiction for the purposes of post-majority education support. If available at a reasonable cost, the court ordered the husband to maintain life insurance in the amount of $200,000, for the benefit of the wife, and life insurance in the amount of $25,000, for the benefit of the minor child. The court awarded the wife the marital residence in New Haven, 50 percent of the husband's pension and the Mazda. The court awarded the husband the Toyota.

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