Little-Used Sensory Evidence Tackled in Quinnipiac Associate Dean's Book

Verbal testimony in personal injury and criminal cases can convey to a judge or jury the pain and suffering a plaintiff or victim has endured. But evidence that re-creates the person's subjective experience, in as much sensory richness as possible, seems to be much more dramatic and effective, claims Quinnipiac University School of Law associate dean and professor Neal Feigenson.