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Law Tribune Announces Professional Excellence Award Winners

The Law Tribune is proud to announce the winners of its first-ever Professional Excellence Awards.

Kevin Kane

State Police, Media Battle in Court Over Newtown Shooter's Documents

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

Months after the Newtown tragedy, State Police released a lot of information on their investigation into the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings and gunman Adam Lanza, but they didn't release everything, and a court battle between authorities and the media over unreleased documents has ensued.

Thomas McNamara

Court Upholds $1 Million Priest Abuse Verdict, Rejects Church Challenge to State Law

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has upheld a $1 million jury verdict in a priest sexual abuse case against the Archdiocese of Hartford. The 57-page majority ruling also shot down challenges from the diocese that the state's expanded statute of limitations for bringing sex abuse claims was unconstitutional.

Best Books: Top Lawyers Offer Summer Reading Suggestions for Peers

A few years ago, the American Bar Association published an article based on interviews with 30 well-known attorneys who were invited to identify what books they have read and would recommend for "pleasure reading." In turn, as the Fourth of July weekend approaches, the Connecticut Law Tribune's Editorial Board is offering a similar array of recommendations for summer reading.

Attorney Dies Amid Probe of Alleged Financial Wrongdoing

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A Stratford-based attorney died in early June under unusual circumstances two months after state disciplinary officials asked that his license be temporarily suspended and two weeks after an appointed trustee for his practice, accompanied by police, tried unsuccessfully to gain access to the house where he practiced.

Federal Lawsuit Says State Veterinary Board Violates Antitrust Laws

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A veterinarian facing possible disciplinary action for giving reduced amount of vaccines to small pets, a practice he asserts is safer for animals, is suing the Connecticut Board of Veterinary Medicine for attempting to discipline him. He claims the number of veterinarians on the board violates federal antitrust laws.

Court Rejects State's Disbarment Request for Lawyer Involved in Fee Dispute

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

The state Appellate Court upheld a lower court's decision to reprimand, rather than disbar, a Bridgeport attorney accused of mishandling a client's funds related to a $1.1 million arbitration award.

Conn.-Based Crabtree & Evelyn Names New General Counsel

By Law Tribune Staff |

Crabtree & Evelyn, the Connecticut-based maker of bath and body products, has appointed a former Hinckley, Allen & Snyder partner to the post of global general counsel.

James Horwitz

Updated: $3M Med-Mal Verdict Comes After Doctor Admits Error

By Christian Nolan |

The estate of a man who died after his heart condition had been misdiagnosed has been awarded $3 million following a jury trial in Hartford.

Longtime Law Firm Leader and Ex-State Senator Passes Away

By Law Tribune Staff |

Lewis Rome, one of the founding members of the prominent law firm of Rome McGuigan in Hartford, has passed away, his colleagues confirmed July 2.

Television Set Maker Sues State Over Recycling Law

By Megan Spicer |

Two years ago, Connecticut beefed up its law governing the regulation of so-called electronic waste. To offset the cost of Connecticut municipalities and transfer stations handling old television sets and other electronic devices, the state charges manufacturers a recycling fee.

Jeffrey Meyer

Judge Orders $2.9 Million Payment to Company to Offset Embezzlement

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A roofing company has won a $2.9 million civil judgment against a former Connecticut employee who allegedly embezzled nearly $1 million to pay for his personal expenses.

Sean McElligott

Botched Shoulder Surgery Results in $4.2 Million Verdict

By Law Tribune Staff |

A 58-year-old man who lost use of one of his shoulders due to an allegedly botched—and unnecessary—surgery has been awarded $4.2 million by a New Haven Superior Court jury.

Beth Steele

PTSD Claim Factors into $284,000 Verdict in Drunk Driving Accident

By Christian Nolan |

Two women who were injured after a drunk driver veered onto the wrong side of the roadway and slammed into their car head-on were recently awarded nearly $284,000 by a judge.

Lawsuit Blames Conn. Troopers for Man's Suicide During Armed Standoff

By Megan Spicer |

Tim Devine appeared set on killing himself on the night of July 23, 2012, and it seemed no amount of negotiation would change his mind.

Steven Klepper

Conn. Judge's Dismissal of Juror Leads Defense Bar to Seek U.S. Supreme Court Review

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

As anyone who has seen the classic Henry Fonda movie "12 Angry Men" knows, a lone juror can ultimately change the outcome in a murder trial.

Convicted Attorney Loses Law License for Five Years

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A longtime attorney from Seymour serving a 30-month federal prison term for money laundering has also been suspended from practicing law for five years.

Law Tribune Seeking New Leaders in the Law Nominations

It’s time to start thinking about the Law Tribune’s annual New Leaders in the Law event.

Stamford-Norwalk Judicial District Gets New State's Attorney

By Law Tribune Staff |

Richard J. Colangelo Jr. will have some big shoes to fill. A state prosecutor for more than two decades, he has been named state's attorney for the Stamford-Norwalk Judicial District.

James Horwitz

Misdiagnosed Heart Condition Leads to $3 Million Med-Mal Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

The estate of a man who died after his heart condition had been misdiagnosed has been awarded $3 million following a jury trial in Hartford.

Disciplinary Hearing Planned in Decade-Long Feud Between Two Lawyers

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

It's been more than a decade that attorneys Joseph Elder and Wesley Spears have been at odds, dating from the day in 2004 that Elder allegedly misrepresented his identity to a Plainville police sergeant and claimed he was Spears. But the case may finally be coming to a head with a hearing scheduled this month before state disciplinary officials.

Veterinarian Goes to Federal Court in Dispute Over Pet Vaccinations

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A veterinarian facing possible disciplinary action for giving reduced amount of vaccines to small pets, a practice he asserts is safer for animals, is suing the Connecticut State Board of Veterinary Medicine for attempting to discipline him. He claims the number of veterinarians on the board violates federal antitrust laws.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: Attorney Sues for OT, Says Document Review Work is Clerical

By Mark Dubois |

The case of Lola v. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom made it to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit the other day, and should make for some interesting reading, though I doubt it will change the law any.

The members of Appearance of Impropriety started off playing cocktail hours, but have expanded their repertoire so that they can rock out when the occasion calls for it.

Band of Lawyers is Big Hit at Legal Gatherings

By Megan Spicer |

The first five minutes of band practice at Ernie Teitell's house is usually spent talking about the day's work, but once everyone gets into the music, the world of Connecticut law is drowned out by the sounds of Appearance of Impropriety.

Attorneys John M. Brown, left, and Stephen J. Brown, far right, represent Kelli and Keith Ferguson, two of four family members who have brought employment law complaints against a catering company.

Father's Firing Leads to Barrage of Employment Lawsuits by Family Members

By Christian Nolan |

The catering business seemed to be in the Heslin family bloodlines. Things couldn't have been better for their lives and their careers until one day when their employer, Fairfield Caterers, decided that at age 70 father Kevin was getting too old for the job. That set off an age discrimination lawsuit that, the Heslins claim, also led to demotions and terminations of three other family members.

Court Says Day-Care Center Can't Fight High-Voltage Line on Property

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Can you run a day care center with a 90-foot tall, 345-kilovolt electric transmission line running through your property? Chester McGurk felt he could not and filed suit against the utility that until recently was called Connecticut Light & Power.

Hugh Keefe

Police Officer Gets New Trial In Crash That Killed Two Teens

By Christian Nolan |

The state Appellate Court has ordered a new trial to a Milford police officer who crashed into a car with two teenagers, killing them both, while racing a colleague in the middle of the night.

David Rosen

Court Says Newtown Police Not Liable for Shooting By Mentally Disturbed Man

By Megan Spicer |

Nearly three years before the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, Newtown police faced another situation involving a person with an apparent mental illness and a firearm. This one didn't result in any loss of life, but it did lead to a gunshot injury and a lawsuit against Newtown police. So far, the courts have said the officers acted properly.

Thomas McNamara

Updated: Justices Reject Church's Challenge to Statute of Limitations Extension

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has upheld a $1 million jury verdict in a priest sexual abuse lawsuit filed against the Archdiocese of Hartford.

Editorial: State Should Eliminate Waiting Period for All Divorces

For many years, Connecticut law has imposed a 90-day waiting period upon any party who wishes to be divorced in this state. It was apparently a matter of public policy that imposing such a delay was deemed important to allow a "cooling-off" period during which parties might reconcile. For a variety of reasons, that policy should be reconsidered and the 90-day waiting period should be eliminated.

David Newman

Conn. Court Affirms 355-Million Ruble Russian Divorce Decree

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

It's not often that Connecticut courts become involved in divorce cases where the monetary stakes are described in Russian rubles.

Christopher Cramer

Phantom Vehicle Blamed in I-91 Crash Resulting in $135,000 Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

A man filed a lawsuit after being rear-ended while driving along Interstate 91, setting off a dispute between two defendants over who was actually responsible for the collision and resulting in a verdict of nearly $134,500.

Editorial: Tax Law Marks New Extreme in Legislative Dysfunction

We are used to the usual chaos at the end of every session of the Connecticut Legislature. This year is no exception. But what is exceptional is the last-minute creation of a unitary tax for national and international corporations.

Veterans With PTSD Who Filed Conn. Lawsuit Get Discharge Upgrade

By Law Tribune Staff |

Five Vietnam combat veterans who brought a federal lawsuit in Connecticut against the Pentagon have been awarded more honorable military discharge status, leaving the future of their litigation in doubt.

Chase Rogers

Conn. Court Says Violent Reclaiming of One's Own Money Isn't Robbery

By Christian Nolan |

A man charged with using violence to get his own money back from an ex-girlfriend has had his acquittal upheld by the state Supreme Court.

Commentary: Courts Should Publicize Pot Conviction Erasures

By Duane Luede |

The Law Tribune recently published a news item titled "Pot Users in No Rush to Clear Names." It was a follow-up to a story published a couple of months earlier in which the state Supreme Court, in State v. Menditto, ruled that a person previously convicted of possession of less than a half-ounce of marijuana was entitled to have that conviction erased on presentation of the appropriate petition and supporting evidence.