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Retire Connecticut Supreme Court Justice David Borden

Court Reinstates Conviction in Murder Case

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has reinstated the murder conviction and 60-year prison sentence of a man who shot and killed someone outside a New Haven nightclub in 2008.

Susan Bysiewicz, of Pastore & Dailey, left, with Jane Miller of Brookfield.

Republican Reinstated to Voter Rolls as Litigation Continues

By MICHELLE TUCCITTO SULLO |

When Brookfield Republicans booted a former local school board member out of the party last year, the political controversy led to litigation and even a proposal to revamp state legislation. In the latest development, Jane Miller of Brookfield has been reinstated as a member of the Republican Party, over a year after her removal.

Jeffrey Meyer

Suit Over Bayer's Essure Birth Control Implant Is Dismissed

By MEGAN SPICER |

Judge Jeffrey Meyer's ruling follows two other dismissals in California.

Jean Jacques

Senators Want 'Consequences' for Countries That Won't Repatriate Violent Offenders

By MEGAN SPICER |

'Casey's Law' is introduced after murder committed by immigrant who was supposed to be returned to Haiti.

Legal Community Mourns Retired State Judge

By MICHELLE TUCCITTO SULLO |

Longtime colleagues of the late Superior Court Judge William Hickey Jr. remembered him fondly this past week as a modest man who was a mentor to many.

Jettisoning the Minority Community

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD |

At a time when American citizens and political leaders are increasingly comfortable with hate speech and the rise of previously subversive gender and racial biases, it is disappointing, though maybe not surprising, that the General Assembly decided to reorganize (eliminate) the six nonpartisan legislative commissions on racial and ethnic minorities and women and children.

Joshua Komisarjevsky

Condemned Home Invasion Killer Resentenced to Life in Prison

By ASSOCIATED PRESS |

A man condemned to die for killing a woman and her two daughters during a 2007 home invasion was resentenced Tuesday to life in prison without the possibility of release because the state abolished the death penalty.

Supreme Court Blocks Two Suits Stemming From Power Plant Explosion

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has barred the lawsuits of two workers injured in a power plant explosion that killed six other people in 2010. The decision will also impact roughly a dozen other injured workers who have similar pending lawsuits against the general contractor at the plant.

Indian Mountain School

Another Molestation Suit Filed Against Boarding School

By MEGAN SPICER |

A New York resident is the third former student of Indian Mountain School in the last two years to allege he was sexually abused there years ago.

Connecticut Supreme Court in Hartford.

Justices' Disagreement Strengthens Court

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD |

Some issues, such as abortion, euthanasia and capital punishment, evoke hard line and devout positions. People are divided in their views on these topics and their beliefs are often firmly entrenched. It is with this mind that we applaud the Supreme Court's decision-making in its recent death-penalty decisions.

Andrew O'Toole

Whistleblower Case Against Psychiatrist Settles for $36K

By MICHELLE TUCCITTO SULLO |

A Danbury-based psychiatrist and mental health practice accused of billing Medicare for brief patient "visits" over the phone agreed to pay over $36,000 to settle allegations that they violated the False Claims Act.

Dove Burns, left, and Stacey Pitcher

New DOL Overtime Rule: Where Does This Leave Connecticut Businesses and Employees?

By Dove A.E. Burns and Stacey L. Pitcher |

With Connecticut's job growth stalling and the expected departure of several large employers, it's not completely clear what the new Department of Labor overtime rule will mean for Connecticut.

Marc Zaken

Epic Showdown Looming Over Employee Class Action Waivers

By MARC ZAKEN AND ASHLEY TOTORICA |

Employers commonly require new employees to execute arbitration agreements as a condition of employment. In many instances, such arbitration agreements contain class/collective action waivers, which provide that any employment-related disputes be adjudicated through arbitration and the employee waives his or her right to file or participate in any class/collective action in court.

Robert Hinton

Workforce Reductions to Avoid Penalties Under the Affordable Care Act

By ROBERT C. HINTON |

With the Affordable Care Act in full swing more than five years after its enactment, employers continue to weigh the costs of ACA compliance against the risks of reducing their workforce mix so as to avoid paying penalties to the Internal Revenue Service.

Danielle Van Katwyk, left, and Cindy Cieslak

Agency Updates Sex Discrimination Laws for Federal Contractors

By Danielle Van Katwyk and Cindy M. Cieslak |

On June 14, the Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) announced its final rule, "Discrimination on the Basis of Sex," which sets forth the requirements that federal contractors (including subcontractors) must meet to fulfill their obligations under Presidential Executive Order 11246.

What Final Overtime Regulations Mean for Connecticut Employers

By JOANNA BOWERS AND JANNA EASTWOOD |

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor released its highly anticipated and contentious revisions to the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime regulations. The new regulations, which go into effect Dec. 1, make significant changes to the salary threshold for classifying an employee as exempt from the overtime requirement pursuant to the administrative, executive and professional exemptions. The changes will likely impact the exemption status of 4.2 million employees nation­wide, including approximately 46,000 employees in Connecticut, resulting in U.S. employers paying an estimated additional $1.2 billion in wages in just the first year of implementation.

Mary Gambardella and Joshua Walls of Wiggin and Dana

How to Reap the Benefits of the New Federal Trade Secret Misappropriation Law

By MARY A. GAMBARDELLA AND JOSHUA B. WALLS |

Employers looking to heighten available protection of valuable trade secrets are welcoming the arrival of the Defend Trade Secrets Act, a federal statute that went into effect May 11. The DTSA permits trade secret owners to file misappropriation claims in federal court, but only those owners who first implement some important changes to confidentiality agreements can reap the full scope of benefits of the new law.

Robert G. Brody and Alexander Friedman

A New Arrow to Attack Those Who Steal Trade Secrets

By ROBERT G. BRODY and ALEXANDER FRIEDMAN |

Last month, Congress passed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016. This momentous new law establishes a federal cause of action for companies who have trade secrets misappropriated. Described by legal scholars as "the most significant expansion of federal law in intellectual property since the Lanham Act in 1946," the act is intended to enhance the ability of companies to fight back against those who would steal their trade secrets.

Patricia E. Reilly, shareholder in Littler Mendelson’s New Haven office

Impact of Defend Trade Secrets Act in Connecticut

By PATRICIA REILLY, STEVE ROSENBERG AND MATT CURTIN |

Connecticut companies have had access to robust enforcement of trade secrets protection primarily through Connecticut's Uniform Trade Secrets Act, Conn. Gen. Stat. §35-51 et seq. With the enactment of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. §1831 et seq., effective May 11, 2016, owners of trade secrets can now pursue a private right of action in federal court to protect trade secrets.

Providing a Path to Legal Status Is in America's Best Interest

By WILLIAM A. STOCK |

The genius of the United States' immigration policy is that it welcomes high-potential individuals who came to the United States as refugees or family-based immigrants.

Gary Phelan

Moving Company Hit With Wage-and-Hour Suit

By MEGAN SPICER |

Mitchell & Sheahan's Gary Phelan envisions a class of 100 from a company that he says refused to pay workers part of their time driving trucks.

Copyright Counsel Eager for Clarity on Fair Use for Viral Videos

By MEGAN SPICER |

Infringing someone's cat video is one thing, but licensing shops may be on shaky ground when it comes to police abuse clips.

Lawyers Restart GM Ignition Switch Litigation

Lawyers are restarting the litigation against General Motors Corp. over its ignition switch recalls after a pair of rulings this month sent the cases down a different road.

Bill Clinton Recalls Budding Love at Yale Law

The roots of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s nearly 40-year political dynasty dates back to a class they took together at Yale Law School in 1971.

Will Cybersecurity Costs Force Small Firms to Merge?

Small firms have smaller staffs and smaller budgets, but their cybersecurity risk may not be proportional. One small boutique recently dealt with that problem by merging with a large firm, but industry watchers said there are ways for firms to manage cyberrisk while remaining small.

Judge Janet Bond Arterton

Insurer Ordered to Pay $10M Policy in Lawyer's Sudden Brain Cancer Death

A Connecticut federal judge has ruled that it was wrong for an insurer to refuse to pay out a $10 million life insurance policy on a Hartford lawyer who died of brain cancer.