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Gugsa Abraham ‘Abe’ Dabela

NAACP Wants Investigation Into Conn. Attorney's Death

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Abe Dabela was 35 years old and life seemed to be going well. He had come to the legal profession late, after a series of jobs in the health care industry, and had recently completed a stint as an associate at a major law firm. He loved riding motorcycles and was passionate about health care, social justice and the Second Amendment.

Law Firm Told to Pay $935,000 in Malpractice Case From 1990s

By Megan Spicer |

A legal malpractice case against Koskoff, Koskoff & Bieder has outlasted the original plaintiff and his wife, and has grown so complex it has been referred to as a trial within a trial within a trial.

Flemming Norcott

Husband Seeks Damages After Learning Wife's Ex-Boss Fathered Two Children

By Christian Nolan |

When David DiMichele was married, his wife gave birth to two children. He raised them as his own for 10 years, only to eventually find out that his wife's former boss was the biological father. That revelation gave rise to a five-year court battle between the husband, the wife and her ex-boss. It's a case that still may not be over.

Bicoastal attorney Loredana Nesci

Former Conn. Lawyer Who Starred in Reality TV Show Killed in California

By Law Tribune Staff |

A Meriden native who worked at two Connecticut law firms before moving to California and starring in a reality television show has died. Police say Loredana Nesci, who billed herself as the "Legal Diva," was found dead Wednesday in the Redondo Beach, California, home she shared with her longtime boyfriend and father of her child.

New Conn. Hispanic Bar President Plans to Push Diversity Efforts

By Megan Spicer |

When Maggie Castinado was called for jury duty while a college undergraduate in Fort Collins, Colorado, she found she was the only minority in the jury pool that day. She eventually served on a panel that decided the fate of two black men charged in Connecticut with a burglary.

Woman Wins $770,000 After Fall on Defective Sidewalk

By Christian Nolan |

A dental hygienist who can no longer work because of a hand injury she sustained after taking a fall on a faulty sidewalk was recently awarded more than $770,000 by a Hartford jury.

Monique Ferraro

With Data Breaches on Rise, New State Law Expands Mandates

By Monique Ferraro |

Earlier this month, legislation was introduced in Congress to provide lifetime identity theft protection services to victims of the breach. And the state of Connecticut is taking aggressive action as well.

Financial Giant to Pay Conn. $2 Million to Settle 'Robo-Signing' Allegations

By Christian Nolan |

The state of Connecticut is slated to receive more than $2 million as part of a settlement agreement between JPMorgan Chase and 47 states over allegations that the financial services giant used illegal tactics to go after consumers who were delinquent in their credit card payments.

Flemming Norcott

Husband Sought Damages After Learning Wife's Ex-Boss Fathered Two Children

By Christian Nolan |

When David DiMichele was married, his wife gave birth to two children. He raised them as his own for 10 years, only to eventually find out that his wife's former boss was the biological father. That revelation gave rise to a five-year court battle between the husband, the wife and her ex-boss. It's a case that still may not be over.

Michael Ross

Legal Journalist's Book Details Decade-Long Relationship With Serial Killer Michael Ross

By Megan Spicer |

Martha Elliott had already spent months exchanging letters with Michael Ross. They had spoken on the phone several times. But she had no idea how she would react when she first saw him in a New London courtroom one early fall day in 1995 waiting for a hearing to begin.

Court Sides With Doctor After Breast Implant Patient Casts Blame for Infection

By Christian Nolan |

The state Appellate Court has upheld a jury's defense verdict in the case of a woman who sued her doctor after her breast implant developed an infection.

Editorial: Confederate Flag Debate Brings Out Overbearing Thought Police

The political thought police have had a field day trying to purge the country's public and private life of the Civil War's Confederate battle flag. It is hard to argue that whatever the banner's original cultural meaning might have been, it has been usurped by the white supremacist racist movement.

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Appellate Court Asked to Settle Another Affordable Housing Dispute

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

In another legal battle over the proposed development of an affordable housing project, Milford wants the state Appellate Court to overturn a trial judge's decision that cleared the way for a 23-unit project in the city.

William Dow

Commentary: A More Relaxed Voir Dire Works Better for All Parties

By William F. Dow III |

As a defense lawyer, I've always believed that voir dire in a criminal case is, in many ways, the most important part of a trial. It's an opportunity to make a good first impression; to find out who is likely to accept the theory of the case; to disclose biases and prejudices and, importantly, to determine who can set them aside. I think it is interesting to explore peoples' backgrounds and attitudes, to try and identify people with whom I can communicate and ultimately to get them on the jury. But to do that I need candid information. The usual criminal voir dire process often doesn't produce that.