Top Stories

Ira Mayo

Female Clients Continue To Cause Trouble for Attorney

Isaac Avilucea | September 2, 2014

Earlier this summer, Torrington attorney Ira Mayo made headlines when he was hit with an unusual punishment: he could never again represent female clients.

Trial Begins for Conn. Attorney Charged with Money Laundering

By ISAAC AVILUCEA |

Hard-charging criminal defense lawyer Ralph Crozier is known for impassioned defense of his clients. But he will be the unfamiliar position of sitting in the defendant's chair when he arrives for the first day of his trial on federal money laundering charges on Tuesday, Sept. 16, in New Haven.

Grand Jury Target Appeals Judicial Bribery Conviction

By Christian Nolan |

A man convicted of bribing a judge is challenging his conviction on grounds that there was not enough evidence against him.

Michael Stratton

New Firm Features Referral Work and Homeless People

By Jay Stapleton |

Well-known plaintiffs lawyer Michael Stratton has been focusing on altruism since resigning his partnership in the New Haven personal injury firm he cofounded. With that in mind, he has launched a new, referral-based law firm that he says will help other attorneys build their personal injury practices.

Mysterious Missing Man Case Leads to Sealed File Request

By THOMAS B. SCHEFFEY |

It was friendly advice, but scary. Manchester attorney Ryan Barry was warned by a judge that he ought to be worried about his personal safety. "These people play for keeps," the jurist warned. "You have a family."

John Cordani

Two Decades Later, Alleged Bomb Maker Wins New Trial

By Christian Nolan |

Kenneth Jamison has been sitting in prison since 1995 for allegedly making and possessing a bomb.

Nicholas Harding

Supreme Court Backs Wind Turbine Approval

By Jay Stapleton |

In a unanimous decision, the state Supreme Court found the Connecticut Siting Council did in fact have jurisdiction to approve the wind turbine project of West Hartford-based BNA energy.

Officials File New Claims Against Torrington Attorney

By ISAAC AVILUCEA |

State grievance officials have made new allegations in their disciplinary case against Torrington attorney Ira Mayo.

Personal Injury Litigation: Conn. Punitive Damages Laws Outdated, Ineffective

By Brendan Faulkner and Michael A. D'Amico |

Punitive damages may be imposed under the common law or specific statutory provisions when a defendant is found to have caused harm by its reckless, wanton or willful conduct.

Robert Reardon

Settlement Leads To Rehab of Once 'Repulsive' Public Housing Complex

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

One lawyer's foray into a class action over public housing in New London started with a slip-and-fall case and ended with an unusual settlement that will see a Superior Court judge overseeing apartment complex renovations.

Thomas Gerarde

'Baseball Rule' May Help Decide Co-ed Softball Lawsuit

By Isaac Avilucea |

Over the years, fans suing team owners for negligence after being struck by foul balls have met Mariano Rivera-like resistance from trial judges. That is to say, they've repeatedly struck out.

Attorney J. Michael Farren, 57, of New Canaan, Conn, is on trial for trying to murder his wife.

Abusive Lawyer's Ex-Wife Lived Life of 'Terror'

By Isaac Avilucea |

Former White House lawyer J. Michael Farren could convincingly "assert appellate rights and make appellate arguments," a Superior Court judge said. But he couldn't muster the three words the judge wanted to hear: "I am sorry."

Michael Stratton

New Firm Features Referral Work and Homeless People

By Jay Stapleton |

Well-known plaintiffs lawyer Michael Stratton has been focusing on altruism since resigning his partnership in the New Haven personal injury firm he cofounded.

Peter Benner

Peter Benner: Early Mediation Works for Lawyers as Well as Clients

By Peter W. Benner |

I have written and spoken regularly on the benefits of early mediation in a litigated dispute. The reasons for early assistance from a neutral third party are compelling: More than 95 percent of civil cases settle.

Grand Jury Target Appeals Judicial Bribery Conviction

By Christian Nolan |

A man convicted of bribing a judge is challenging his conviction on grounds that there was not enough evidence against him.

Attorney J. Michael Farren, 57, of New Canaan, Conn, is on trial for trying to murder his wife.

Farren Shows No Remorse, Gets 15-Year Sentence for Attack on Wife

By Isaac Avilucea |

More than four years after former White House lawyer J. Michael Farren brutally beat his then-wife with a flashlight and his hands in their Darien home, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison on Thursday.

Second Circuit Says Conn. Business Law Violates First Amendment

By Mark Hamblett |

A federal appeals court has struck down a Connecticut law that forced an insurance company and auto glass repair business to mention a competitor's name if the insurer violated a ban on promoting its own repair shops.

Michelle Cruz: Prosecutor's Bad Decision Puts Rice's Wife at Risk

By Michelle Cruz |

The recently released video of pro football star Ray Rice's vicious attack on his then-girlfriend Janay Palmer (they're now married) provides a rare window into the life of a domestic violence victim.

Conn. AG Leads Probe of Home Depot Data Breach

By Law Tribune Staff and Wire Reports |

Goodusky: The Down Side of Legal Technology

By Amy Goodusky |

As some of you know, back when pterodactyls nested in New Haven, I was a working musician. I am wont to state, whenever anyone asks me about it, that there are circular slabs of grooved vinyl tucked into cardboard sleeves to prove that this actually happened.

Dubois-Mark

Dubois: Advocates Should Weigh In on Controversial Matters

By Mark Dubois |

I read that Tom Goldstein, the fella who started SCOTUSblog, filed a brief in the Supreme Court on behalf of no client which did not argue one way or the other on the merits of the case.

Attorney J. Michael Farren, 57, of New Canaan, Conn, is on trial for trying to murder his wife.

Conn. Lawyer To Be Sentenced For Attempted Murder

By Isaac Avilucea |

J. Michael Farren will be sentenced Thursday, Sept. 11, in Stamford Superior Court for the near-fatal beating of his ex-wife, Mary Margaret.

John Rowland

Candidate's Husband Testifies That He Hid Rowland's Campaign Work

By Associated Press |

The key prosecution witness at John Rowland's federal conspiracy trial testified Monday, Sept. 8, that he hired the former Connecticut governor as a consultant for his wife's 2012 congressional campaign and hid the arrangement as a business deal with his nursing home company.

Candidate's Husband Testifies That He Hid Rowland's Campaign Work

By Associated Press |

The key prosecution witness at John Rowland's federal conspiracy trial testified that he hired the former Connecticut governor as a consultant for his wife's 2012 congressional campaign and hid the arrangement as a business deal with his nursing home company.

Pawn King owner William Mingione is the target of a federal lawsuit over fees charged by pawnshop owners.

Supreme Court: State Law Limits Pawn Shops' Interest Rates

By Jay Stapleton |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has issued a ruling that will likely impact how dozens of pawnshops in the state do business in the future.

Ira Mayo

Additional Sexual Misconduct Allegations Made Against Torrington Lawyer

By Isaac Avilucea |

For the moment, Torrington attorney Ira Mayo still has his law license. A hearing on a motion by state grievance officials to disbar him was continued Monday, Sept. 8, in Middletown Superior Court.

Editorial: Where Are All the Law School Applicants?

Nearly every law school in America is facing declining applications. Nationally, the level of applications has declined back to the level of 1976.

Conn. Lawyer Pushes Safety Measures After Son Dies in Hot Car

By Jay Stapleton |

In the weeks since 15-month-old Benjamin Seitz perished after being left in a hot car for several hours, his mother has launched an awareness campaign.

Rachel Goldberg

Transgender Activists Say State Anti-Bias Law Is Working

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Studying landmark cases may be a hallmark of a legal education, but there are times when the lack of case law may be a good thing.

Roman Storzer

City, Islamic Group Near Settlement in Mosque Suit

By Jay Stapleton |

Lawyers representing an Islamic group that wants to build a mosque in Norwalk had run up an estimated $5.5 million legal tab. That number was making attorneys representing the city a bit nervous.

Appeal of 1986 Murder Hinges on Belated DNA Tests

By Christian Nolan |

After Kenneth Ireland spent nearly two decades behind bars for murder, DNA evidence exonerated him in 2009.

History of Sanctions Catch Up With Med-Mal Defender

By Thomas B. Scheffey |

In Connecticut's top ranks of medical malpractice defense lawyers, Bridgeport's Madonna Sacco is a hero to doctors and their insurance companies.

Gregg Adler

DMV Workers' Suit Claims Reverse Discrimination

By Isaac Avilucea |

In alleging a form of reverse discrimination, 13 inspectors from the state's Department of Motor Vehicles are hoping there is power in numbers.

Frank Bartlett Jr

Minor Accident Leads to Major Injuries for Plaintiff

By Isaac Avilucea |

A 2011 two-car, fender-bender in Milford involving Josephine Feliciano and Danielle Burns resulted in a Bridgeport Superior Court jury awarding $55,022 in damages.

Andrew Schneider

After Eventful Term, Conn. ACLU Chief Steps Down

By Jay Stapleton |

In the seven years that Andrew Schneider has been the executive director of the American Civil Liberties of Connecticut, the civil rights organization has been involved in several ground-breaking legal issues.

Senators Criticize Delays in Danbury Prison Project

By Law Tribune Staff |

Connecticut's U.S. senators are expressing displeasure with the federal government, because work on the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury is lagging far behind schedule.

Gideon

Gideon: Producer's Arrest Illustrates Perils of 'Existing While Black'

By Gideon |

"Tall," "bald-headed" and "black male" are apparently the only identifiers of Charles Belk, who recently spent six hours in police custody because he fit the description of a bank robber.

Robert Reardon

Welder's Family Settles for $1.5 Million in Wrongful Death Case

By Law Tribune Staff |

The family of a Dayville man who was killed when he fell down an elevator shaft while doing welding work at a construction site has settled their wrongful death lawsuit for $1.5 million.

Editorial: Bar Examiners Asking Wrong Questions About Mental Fitness

The Connecticut Bar Examining Committee has taken an admirable but long overdue step to amend its questions regarding mental health.

Elliot Solomon

Task Force May Revive MCLE Discussions in Conn.

By Jay Stapleton |

A Judicial Branch task force will apparently revive discussions on whether Connecticut should require attorneys to complete some form of continuing legal education.

Norm Pattis: Whole Truth May Be Scarce Commodity At Rowland Trial

By Norm Pattis |

John Rowland's back on center stage, and, once again, jurors will be told half the truth, and anything but the entire truth.

Convicted Cheshire Killer Asks Supreme Court for New Trial

By Associated Press |

One of two men convicted in the killings of a mother and her two daughters in the 2007 Cheshire home invasion is seeking a new trial.

Ira Mayo

Female Clients Continue To Cause Trouble for Attorney

By Isaac Avilucea |

Earlier this summer, Torrington attorney Ira Mayo made headlines when he was hit with an unusual punishment: he could never again represent female clients.

One Officer Targeted in Half Dozen Excessive-Force Lawsuits

By Isaac Avilucea |

These days, it's hard for Hartford attorney A. Paul Spinella to find a police excessive-force case that isn't similar to one he has litigated in more than 30 years of practicing.

Police at the home on Dogwood Drive, in Easton, Conn. where Gonzalo Guizan was shot and killed by police during a raid on May 18th, 2008.

Court Says SWAT Team Can Be Held Liable for Aggressive Actions

By Jay Stapleton |

After unarmed teenager Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., residents took to the streets in protest, only to be confronted by police in camouflage uniforms who used tear gas, attack dogs and armored vehicles.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: Should UPL Rules Adapt to 21st-Century Realities?

By Mark Dubois |

When I travel for bar business, I have taken to using Air BNB, an Internet matching service that hooks me up with folks willing to rent out a room or an apartment for a few days.

Marissa Dungey

Young Trusts and Estates Lawyer Lands ABA Fellowship

By Isaac Avilucea |

An upcoming wedding, prestigious new honor and a soon-to-be-published article. One could say Marissa Dungey's life has hit the proverbial sweet spot.

Editorial: Religious Expression Becomes Religious Dominance

Analysis of the Hobby Lobby decision has swirled across news and social media since its June 30 release.

Edward Haberek

Selectman’s Uninvited Hug Spawns Harassment Complaint and Freedom of Information Case

By Thomas B. Scheffey |

Though workplace harassment is a major employment law issue, this legal tale has a bigger element: freedom of information. The question now is, should the woman's report be a public document?

Richard Condon

Conn. Court Clears Man Convicted Of Threatening Attorney

By Jay Stapleton |

For more than 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court has made it perfectly clear that what it calls "true threats" to harm another person are not protected speech under the First Amendment.

Domino's Pizza Driver Crash Delivers $1.6 Million Settlement

By Jay Stapleton |

A former Storrs resident has settled for $1.6 million her lawsuit against a Domino's Pizza driver who plowed into the car she was riding in.

James Bergenn

Photographer's Drone Suit Pits Journalists Against Police

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A Connecticut television photographer's federal lawsuit could shed some legal light on how far journalists can go to record police activity and what rights they might have to use drones to gather news.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: Law Students Should Be Paid for Legal Work

By Mark Dubois |

If firms could employ law students who would be both paid and supervised, both by the firms and the schools, this might be a good way to fill what has been called the justice gap.

Attorneys Named to Veterans Affairs Advisory Group

By Law Tribune Staff |

Several attorneys will be part of a new advisory group appointed by Gov. Dannel Malloy to look into ways to improve facilities and programs offered at the state Department of Veteran Affairs' Rocky Hill campus.

Editorial: Confronting Bullying Within the Legal Profession

For well over a decade leaders in the organized bar have focused on the quality of civility and professionalism among lawyers.

Conn. Firm Pays $1.3 Million After Retractable Dog Leash Malfunctions

By Jay Stapleton |

A building contractor who lost the vision in one eye after a retractable dog leash recoiled and struck his face has settled his product liability lawsuit against a Connecticut company for $1.3 million.

Dan Krisch

Dan Krisch: Nation Paying Millions for Lock 'Em Up Strategy

By Dan Krisch |

The definition of insanity, Einstein supposedly quipped, is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results. By that standard, our nation's criminal justice strategy belongs in Bellevue.

Court: Towns Can Be Sued in Fatal Raid

By Associated Press |

A federal appeals court says several Connecticut police departments can be sued over a drug raid that killed an unarmed man and injured another in 2008.

Supreme Court Ruling Puts Juvenile Appeals on Hold

By Christian Nolan |

If a teen wants to appeal a judge's decision transferring his criminal case to adult court from the juvenile court, he's going to be waiting a while.

Linda Morkan

Practitioners Say Appeals Process is Widely Misunderstood

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

According to appellate court judges and practitioners alike, appellate practice in Connecticut requires a specialized form of advocacy that is not understood by all litigants.

Garden of Light Natural Foods Market

Supreme Court Upholds $110,000 Health Food Store Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

"Natural foods" is a term used to describe foods that are minimally processed or do not contain any additives like sweeteners, antibiotics or hormones. In Connecticut, though, natural foods may still include litigation.

Judge William Bright

LawyerCorps Connecticut Prepares to Launch Public Service Careers

By Isaac Avilucea |

LawyerCorps Connecticut will partner fellows with the state's legal aid organizations and surround them with infrastructure and mentors. The goal is to provide legal services to those who need them most.

Jennifer Gerarda Brown

Quinnipiac University Opens New Law School Building

By Jay Stapleton |

The new $50 million Quinnipiac University School of Law Center is built around its expansive library.

Ira Mayo

Suspended Lawyer Faces Disbarment for New Allegation

By Isaac Avilucea |

A Torrington attorney's law career hangs in the balance after he was accused of violating a new court order that banned him from ever representing female clients for the remainder of his career.

Prosecutor: No Criminal Charges in Irene Aid Fraud

By Associated Press |

Connecticut prosecutors say they won't pursue criminal charges against state employees and others who fraudulently obtained emergency food stamp benefits designated for people affected by Tropical Storm Irene in 2011.

Pattis-Norm

Norm Pattis: 'Unleashed Attack Dogs' Won't Help in Ferguson

By Norm Pattis |

I couldn't stop thinking about the allegory of the metals in Plato's Republic as I read the op-ed piece in The Washington Post written by Los Angeles Police Officer, Sunil Dutta.

Editorial: Proper Role of Trustees for Nonprofit Entities

Recently, counsel for a Connecticut independent school prepared a memorandum on the role of trustees. This checklist exemplifies many sound board practices and may be useful guidance to other boards of nonprofit entities.

Judge Approves Receivership for Amistad Schooner

By Associated Press |

A Connecticut judge on Thursday appointed a receiver to take over the operations and finances of the group that runs the state's official flagship, the Amistad schooner.

Judge Holly Fitzsimmons

U.S. Magistrate Judge Holly Fitzsimmons Will Retire in April

By Isaac Avilucea |

From serving as a federal prosecutor in a murder-for-hire plot to working as a sportswriter, Holly Fitzsimmons' career has been full of adventure.

Dubois-Mark

CBA President Declares Vote Too Close to Join Amicus

By Jay Stapleton |

Members of the Connecticut Bar Association have voted only slightly in favor of joining a legal defense of Connecticut gun control legislation with all votes in, resulting in the outcome being "called as tied," CBA President Mark Dubois said.

Editorial: As Lawyers, We Should Expand Our Inner Circles

The practice of law is a people business, centered largely around relationships. Having connections helps get clients, jobs, referrals, interviews, leadership positions and even award nominations.

Business Litigation Firm Hires Two Attorneys From Hinckley Allen

By Isaac Avilucea |

The expansion of a Wethersfield law firm was effectively done years ago over beers at a local bar. That's where Bill O'Sullivan met with his now-new partner Michael McCormack to plot out the future of his firm.

Marcy Tench Stovall

CBA Names New Ethics Committee Chair

By Jay Stapleton |

As she begins her new role as Chair of the Connecticut Bar Association Standing Committee on Professional Ethics, Marcy Tench Stovall anticipates there will be a continued emphasis on ethics rules regarding technology.

Ralph Nader, during a hearing by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation’s Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance, titled “Examining Accountability and Corporate Culture in Wake of the GM Recalls.” July 17, 2014. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Construction Begins at Ralph Nader's Tort Museum

By Isaac Avilucea |

Construction crews in late July cordoned off the entrances of Winsted Savings Bank with yellow tape to work on the interior of what will become the American Museum of Tort Law.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: How the Legal Profession Is Like Amazon

By Mark Dubois |

My wife works in book publishing. Whenever I lament the changes overtaking the legal profession, she responds with something like, "You should try my business."

Editorial: It's Time That Time Ran Against the King

When the state is undertaking the construction of a building, like any other owner would in the private sector, there is simply no reason to allow its representatives to escape the consequences of inexcusable delay in exercising the state's rights.

Emergency personnel and vehicles work an accident in Avon, Conn., that occurred Friday, July 29, 2005. At least five people were killed and several others injured in the multiple vehicle accident.

Court Bars Lawsuits Against State in Deadly Crash

By Christian Nolan |

Plaintiffs lawyers hoped the state's defective road statute would provide an avenue for lawsuits against the state in the aftermath of the 2005 fiery crash at the bottom of Avon Mountain that killed four people and injured 19 others.

Law Tribune Seeks Verdict And Settlement Results

If you or your firm has been involved in an interesting lawsuit, we would like to hear about it.

Stratford Attorney Is Charged With Larceny

By Jay Stapleton |

A Stratford attorney has been charged with larceny as a result of a dispute concerning his fee in a workers' compensation case.

Jay Ruane

Justices Refuse To Allow Sobriety Test Demonstration In Court

By Christian Nolan |

A defendant claims he was denied a fair trial on charges of driving under the influence because he was not allowed to demonstrate in court how his knee injury prevented him from passing field sobriety tests.

Benjamin Ancona

Couple Wins $309,000 in Dog Attack Lawsuit

By Christian Nolan |

A Newington couple who were attacked by a pair of angry bullmastiff dogs was awarded $309,000 following a bench trial recently.

Casino Lawsuit Reveals Gambling Strategies of High-Rollers

By Isaac Avilucea |

A lawsuit brought by three Chinese nationals claims a Connecticut casino illegally withheld more than $1.1 million in their winnings from the baccarat table.

Probate Staff Attorney Accused of Misconduct

By Isaac Avilucea |

A three-judge panel will decide later this month whether Debra Cohen should be fired from her post as a staff attorney in the Office of the Probate Court Administrator.

Jury box..Photo by Jason Doiy.2-9-11.054-2011

Editorial: Embrace Voluntary Panel Voir Dire

We encourage attorneys to embrace panel voir dire jury selection in Connecticut state civil trial courts.

Appellate Court Overturns 60-Year Murder Sentence

By Christian Nolan |

A man charged with shooting and killing a man outside a New Haven nightclub in 2008 could be headed to his third trial after a recent state Appellate Court decision.

Norm Pattis: The Vanishing Trial Puts Justice in Peril

By Norm Pattis |

"If you gaze long enough into the abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you." I think about this line of Friedrich Nietszche's more often than I care to admit.

Online Voting Underway in CBA Gun Control Amicus Referendum

By Jay Stapleton |

Connecticut Bar Association members have until midnight on Tuesday, Aug. 19, to vote on whether the organization should join in a legal defense of state gun control legislation passed in the wake of the Newtown school shooting.

Martin Zeldis

Top Conn. Appellate Public Defender Steps Down

By Isaac Avilucea |

What made Martin Zeldis's career fruitful was not the low-hanging fruit.

Online Voting Underway on CBA Gun Control Amicus Issue

By Jay Stapleton |

Connecticut Bar Association members have until midnight on Tuesday, Aug. 19, to vote on whether the organization should join in a legal defense of Connecticut gun control legislation passed in the wake of the Newtown school shooting.

Zenas Zelotes

Court Upholds Suspension of Lawyer Who Had 'Intimate' Relationship with Client

By Jay Stapleton |

The state Appellate Court has affirmed the five-month suspension of a Connecticut bankruptcy lawyer who was disciplined for having an intimate relationship with a client.

Chase Rogers

Appellate Bar Would Like Speedier Conn. Supreme Court Decisions

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

It may be the most comment lament of litigants when they appeal their cases: "When will the court decide my case?"

Julia B. Morris and Susan L. Miller

Growing Conn. Firm Absorbs Four-Lawyer Insurance Defense Practice

By Jay Stapleton |

A firm that has been expanding its footprint in recent years just took another step forward by absorbing a smaller four-lawyer firm.

Lisa Steele

Court OKs Crime Victim's Online Research

By Christian Nolan |

Connecticut's highest court has upheld the conviction of a man involved in a shooting in a case that raised questions about eyewitness identifications in the digital age.

Editorial: State Makes Bad Decision with Gender-Based Attorney Sanction

It was recently announced that a Connecticut attorney has been suspended from practice for four months and prohibited from representing women for the rest of his legal career.

George Jepsen

AGs Target Greenwich Law Firm in Mortgage Scam Suit

By Law Tribune Staff |

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen and Florida's attorney general have filed suit against a Greenwich law firm accused of masterminding a scam aimed at mortgage holders.

Zenas Zelotes

Court Upholds Suspension of Attorney Who Had 'Intimate' Relationship with Client

By Jay Stapleton |

The state Appellate Court has affirmed the five-month suspension of a Connecticut bankruptcy lawyer who was disciplined for having an intimate relationship with a client.

Conn. Supreme Court Bars Lawsuits in Avon Mountain Crash

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has dismissed two lawsuits that were brought against the state by victims of the 2005 fiery crash at the bottom of Avon Mountain that killed four people and injured 19 others.

Mark Dubois

Mark Dubois: Bar Groups Nationwide Wrestle with Political Issues

By Mark Dubois |

I went to a meeting of the National Council of Bar Presidents the other day. The plenary session was on the issue of whether bar associations should embrace or run from controversial social issues. It was time well spent.

Sandra Staub

Ruling Focuses on Rights of Suspects' Companions

By Christian Nolan |

For Jeremy Kelly, it was wrong place, wrong time. He was walking in Hartford one evening with a man police mistakenly thought was the subject of an arrest warrant. So when police stopped his friend, Rafael Burgos, they also detained him.

Victoria Veltri

High-Profile Cases Highlight Role of State Advocates

By Jay Stapleton |

In her first career, Victoria Veltri worked as a legal aid lawyer in Hartford.