Top Stories

Edward ‘Jack’ Dunham

Franchise Lawyer Known for Subway Work Passes Away

Christian Nolan | May 8, 2015

Colleagues at Wiggin and Dana say Edward "Jack" Dunham was the top franchise lawyer in the country. His clients included the largest franchisor in the world—Milford-based Subway.

Longtime Law Firm Leader and Ex-State Senator Passes Away

By Law Tribune Staff |

Lewis Rome, one of the founding members of the prominent law firm of Rome McGuigan in Hartford, has passed away, his colleagues confirmed July 2.

Steven Klepper

Conn. Judge's Dismissal of Juror Leads Defense Bar to Seek U.S. Supreme Court Review

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

As anyone who has seen the classic Henry Fonda movie "12 Angry Men" knows, a lone juror can ultimately change the outcome in a murder trial.

The members of Appearance of Impropriety started off playing cocktail hours, but have expanded their repertoire so that they can rock out when the occasion calls for it.

Band of Lawyers is Big Hit at Legal Gatherings

By Megan Spicer |

The first five minutes of band practice at Ernie Teitell's house is usually spent talking about the day's work, but once everyone gets into the music, the world of Connecticut law is drowned out by the sounds of Appearance of Impropriety.

Sean McElligott

Botched Shoulder Surgery Results in $4.2 Million Verdict

By Law Tribune Staff |

A 58-year-old man who lost use of one of his shoulders due to an allegedly botched—and unnecessary—surgery has been awarded $4.2 million by a New Haven Superior Court jury.

Court Rejects State's Disbarment Request for Lawyer Involved in Fee Dispute

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

The state Appellate Court upheld a lower court's decision to reprimand, rather than disbar, a Bridgeport attorney accused of mishandling a client's funds related to a $1.1 million arbitration award.

Thomas McNamara

Updated: Justices Reject Church's Challenge to Statute of Limitations Extension

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has upheld a $1 million jury verdict in a priest sexual abuse lawsuit filed against the Archdiocese of Hartford.

Stamford-Norwalk Judicial District Gets New State's Attorney

By Law Tribune Staff |

Richard J. Colangelo Jr. will have some big shoes to fill. A state prosecutor for more than two decades, he has been named state's attorney for the Stamford-Norwalk Judicial District.

Lawsuit Blames Conn. Troopers for Man's Suicide During Armed Standoff

By Megan Spicer |

Tim Devine appeared set on killing himself on the night of July 23, 2012, and it seemed no amount of negotiation would change his mind.

James Horwitz

Updated: $3M Med-Mal Verdict Comes After Doctor Admits Error

By Christian Nolan |

The estate of a man who died after his heart condition had been misdiagnosed has been awarded $3 million following a jury trial in Hartford.

Conn.-Based Crabtree & Evelyn Names New General Counsel

By Law Tribune Staff |

Crabtree & Evelyn, the Connecticut-based maker of bath and body products, has appointed a former Hinckley, Allen & Snyder partner to the post of global general counsel.

Jeffrey Meyer

Judge Orders $2.9 Million Payment to Company to Offset Embezzlement

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A roofing company has won a $2.9 million civil judgment against a former Connecticut employee who allegedly embezzled nearly $1 million to pay for his personal expenses.

Law Tribune Announces Professional Excellence Award Winners

The Law Tribune is proud to announce the winners of its first-ever Professional Excellence Awards.

Best Books: Top Lawyers Offer Summer Reading Suggestions for Peers

A few years ago, the American Bar Association published an article based on interviews with 30 well-known attorneys who were invited to identify what books they have read and would recommend for "pleasure reading." In turn, as the Fourth of July weekend approaches, the Connecticut Law Tribune's Editorial Board is offering a similar array of recommendations for summer reading.

Kevin Kane

State Police, Media Battle in Court Over Newtown Shooter's Documents

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

Months after the Newtown tragedy, State Police released a lot of information on their investigation into the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings and gunman Adam Lanza, but they didn't release everything, and a court battle between authorities and the media over unreleased documents has ensued.

Television Set Maker Sues State Over Recycling Law

By Megan Spicer |

Two years ago, Connecticut beefed up its law governing the regulation of so-called electronic waste. To offset the cost of Connecticut municipalities and transfer stations handling old television sets and other electronic devices, the state charges manufacturers a recycling fee.

Thomas McNamara

Court Upholds $1 Million Priest Abuse Verdict, Rejects Church Challenge to State Law

By Christian Nolan |

The Connecticut Supreme Court has upheld a $1 million jury verdict in a priest sexual abuse case against the Archdiocese of Hartford. The 57-page majority ruling also shot down challenges from the diocese that the state's expanded statute of limitations for bringing sex abuse claims was unconstitutional.

Veterinarian Goes to Federal Court in Dispute Over Pet Vaccinations

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A veterinarian facing possible disciplinary action for giving reduced amount of vaccines to small pets, a practice he asserts is safer for animals, is suing the Connecticut State Board of Veterinary Medicine for attempting to discipline him. He claims the number of veterinarians on the board violates federal antitrust laws.

Court Says Day-Care Center Can't Fight High-Voltage Line on Property

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Can you run a day care center with a 90-foot tall, 345-kilovolt electric transmission line running through your property? Chester McGurk felt he could not and filed suit against the utility that until recently was called Connecticut Light & Power.

Beth Steele

PTSD Claim Factors into $284,000 Verdict in Drunk Driving Accident

By Christian Nolan |

Two women who were injured after a drunk driver veered onto the wrong side of the roadway and slammed into their car head-on were recently awarded nearly $284,000 by a judge.

James Horwitz

Misdiagnosed Heart Condition Leads to $3 Million Med-Mal Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

The estate of a man who died after his heart condition had been misdiagnosed has been awarded $3 million following a jury trial in Hartford.

Federal Lawsuit Says State Veterinary Board Violates Antitrust Laws

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A veterinarian facing possible disciplinary action for giving reduced amount of vaccines to small pets, a practice he asserts is safer for animals, is suing the Connecticut Board of Veterinary Medicine for attempting to discipline him. He claims the number of veterinarians on the board violates federal antitrust laws.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: Attorney Sues for OT, Says Document Review Work is Clerical

By Mark Dubois |

The case of Lola v. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom made it to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit the other day, and should make for some interesting reading, though I doubt it will change the law any.

Hugh Keefe

Police Officer Gets New Trial In Crash That Killed Two Teens

By Christian Nolan |

The state Appellate Court has ordered a new trial to a Milford police officer who crashed into a car with two teenagers, killing them both, while racing a colleague in the middle of the night.

Christopher Cramer

Phantom Vehicle Blamed in I-91 Crash Resulting in $135,000 Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

A man filed a lawsuit after being rear-ended while driving along Interstate 91, setting off a dispute between two defendants over who was actually responsible for the collision and resulting in a verdict of nearly $134,500.

David Rosen

Court Says Newtown Police Not Liable for Shooting By Mentally Disturbed Man

By Megan Spicer |

Nearly three years before the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, Newtown police faced another situation involving a person with an apparent mental illness and a firearm. This one didn't result in any loss of life, but it did lead to a gunshot injury and a lawsuit against Newtown police. So far, the courts have said the officers acted properly.

Law Tribune Seeking New Leaders in the Law Nominations

It’s time to start thinking about the Law Tribune’s annual New Leaders in the Law event.

Attorney Dies Amid Probe of Alleged Financial Wrongdoing

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A Stratford-based attorney died in early June under unusual circumstances two months after state disciplinary officials asked that his license be temporarily suspended and two weeks after an appointed trustee for his practice, accompanied by police, tried unsuccessfully to gain access to the house where he practiced.

Editorial: Tax Law Marks New Extreme in Legislative Dysfunction

We are used to the usual chaos at the end of every session of the Connecticut Legislature. This year is no exception. But what is exceptional is the last-minute creation of a unitary tax for national and international corporations.

David Newman

Conn. Court Affirms 355-Million Ruble Russian Divorce Decree

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

It's not often that Connecticut courts become involved in divorce cases where the monetary stakes are described in Russian rubles.

Editorial: State Should Eliminate Waiting Period for All Divorces

For many years, Connecticut law has imposed a 90-day waiting period upon any party who wishes to be divorced in this state. It was apparently a matter of public policy that imposing such a delay was deemed important to allow a "cooling-off" period during which parties might reconcile. For a variety of reasons, that policy should be reconsidered and the 90-day waiting period should be eliminated.

Veterans With PTSD Who Filed Conn. Lawsuit Get Discharge Upgrade

By Law Tribune Staff |

Five Vietnam combat veterans who brought a federal lawsuit in Connecticut against the Pentagon have been awarded more honorable military discharge status, leaving the future of their litigation in doubt.

Convicted Attorney Loses Law License for Five Years

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A longtime attorney from Seymour serving a 30-month federal prison term for money laundering has also been suspended from practicing law for five years.

Chase Rogers

Conn. Court Says Violent Reclaiming of One's Own Money Isn't Robbery

By Christian Nolan |

A man charged with using violence to get his own money back from an ex-girlfriend has had his acquittal upheld by the state Supreme Court.

Disciplinary Hearing Planned in Decade-Long Feud Between Two Lawyers

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

It's been more than a decade that attorneys Joseph Elder and Wesley Spears have been at odds, dating from the day in 2004 that Elder allegedly misrepresented his identity to a Plainville police sergeant and claimed he was Spears. But the case may finally be coming to a head with a hearing scheduled this month before state disciplinary officials.

Attorneys John M. Brown, left, and Stephen J. Brown, far right, represent Kelli and Keith Ferguson, two of four family members who have brought employment law complaints against a catering company.

Father's Firing Leads to Barrage of Employment Lawsuits by Family Members

By Christian Nolan |

The catering business seemed to be in the Heslin family bloodlines. Things couldn't have been better for their lives and their careers until one day when their employer, Fairfield Caterers, decided that at age 70 father Kevin was getting too old for the job. That set off an age discrimination lawsuit that, the Heslins claim, also led to demotions and terminations of three other family members.

Commentary: Courts Should Publicize Pot Conviction Erasures

By Duane Luede |

The Law Tribune recently published a news item titled "Pot Users in No Rush to Clear Names." It was a follow-up to a story published a couple of months earlier in which the state Supreme Court, in State v. Menditto, ruled that a person previously convicted of possession of less than a half-ounce of marijuana was entitled to have that conviction erased on presentation of the appropriate petition and supporting evidence.

Xavier Pryor

Motorcycle-Minivan Accident Results in $143,000 Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

A man who was thrown from his motorcycle after another vehicle turned left in front of him was recently awarded roughly $143,000 by a Hartford jury.

Pattis-Norm

Norm Pattis: Delayed Case Is Like Something Out of a Novel

By Norm Pattis |

Were Charles Dickens alive, he might choose the case of Ricciuti v. Gyzenis as the topic of a latter-day "Bleak House."

Mark Sommaruga

Commentary: 'Deflategate' Offers Legal Lessons for NFL and Employment Lawyers

By Mark J. Sommaruga |

To begin with, full disclosure: I am a lifelong New England Patriots fan (and season ticket holder). However, as an attorney I am trained to be objective. The aftermath of the "Deflategate" investigation should be of interest to both sports fans and employers, and represents a cautionary tale for both a popular sports league and the workplace in general.

James Harrington

Casino Pays $775,000 Settlement After Limo Crash Injures Passenger

By Christian Nolan |

A man who was injured while riding in a limousine on his way home from a casino has settled his lawsuit in the Mohegan Tribal Court for $775,000.

John Buckley and his family at the Belmont Stakes.

Attorney's Thoroughbred Investment Leads to Up-Close View of Horse-Racing History

By Megan Spicer |

While nearly everyone else in the grandstand was focused on American Pharaoh in the Belmont Stakes, John Buckley's eyes were set on one of his challengers. That's because Buckley, a New Haven attorney, is part owner of Keen Ice, a colt that some oddsmakers thought had the biggest chance of springing an upset.

Beth Carpenter

Ex-Lawyer Convicted in Murder-for-Hire Case Loses Bid for New Trial

By Associated Press |

A former Connecticut lawyer has lost her bid for a new trial in a murder-for-hire case that landed her in prison for life and was depicted in books and TV shows.

William Clendenen

Incoming CBA President Looks to Expand Membership, Cultivate New Leaders

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

As William Clendenen Jr. gets ready to lead the Connecticut Bar Association as its new president, his goals include increasing membership, providing more leadership opportunities to young and diverse lawyers, and helping the poor get needed legal assistance. Clendenen, founder and principal of Clendenen & Shea in New Haven, officially takes over the reins on July 1.

Conn. Judge Certifies Challenge to Medicare Appeals System

By Christian Nolan |

A federal judge in Connecticut has given a group of Medicare beneficiaries permission to bring a class action lawsuit challenging the government health insurance program's failure to decide appeals within the 90 days required by law.

Conn. Judge Certifies Class Action Challenge to Medicare Appeals System

By Christian Nolan |

A federal judge in Connecticut has given a group of Medicare beneficiaries permission to bring a class action lawsuit challenging the government health insurance program's failure to decide appeals within the 90 days required by law.

Kevin Tighe

Judge Vacates $5 Million Verdict in Land Use Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A Stamford judge has vacated a $5 million verdict awarded to a developer for alleged violations of its constitutional rights because the developer never applied to a town planning and zoning commission for approval to build a subdivision.

Noah J. Kores

Commentary: Ban on Depositions in Criminal Cases Unfair to Defense

By Noah Kores |

The rules of criminal procedure are unfair, dare I say unconstitutional, in Connecticut.

RIchard Newman

Conn. Trial Lawyer Named to Head Nader's New Tort Museum

By Law Tribune Staff |

In 2013, Connecticut native and iconic consumer advocate Ralph Nader announced he would open an American Museum of Tort Law in his hometown of Winsted.

Rowena Moffett

Dentist Wins $1 Million Verdict After Suing Convicted Partner

By Christian Nolan |

In 2012, Connecticut filed a civil lawsuit against nearly 30 players in an elaborate scheme to defraud Medicaid.

Joette Katz

Court Upholds Firing of DCF Worker Charged With Baby's Death

By Christian Nolan |

A divided state Supreme Court has upheld a decision by the state Department of Children and Families to fire a social worker who was charged with manslaughter in the death of her own foster child.

Ellen Ash Peters

Honors Night Awards: As Chief Justice, Ellen Ash Peters Brought A Unique Perspective to the Bench

By Thomas B. Scheffey |

A long list of unwritten rules were broken in 1978, when Gov. Ella Grasso appointed Ellen Ash Peters to the Supreme Court.

Phillip Blumberg

Honors Night Awards: Phillip Blumberg's Vision Helped Transform UConn Law School

By Thomas B. Scheffey |

In 1974, when a search committee picked Phillip I. Blumberg out of a field of nine candidates to be dean of the University of Connecticut School of Law, he far outshone the competition.

Martha Stone

Honors Night Awards: Martha Stone Has Devoted Decades to Child Advocacy

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

Martha Stone's office is decorated with photos of young people whose lives she has changed over the years. There are collages of graduating teens in caps and gowns, with the message, "Look what happens when we stick with our kids."

Federal Judge Orders Conn. Lawyer to Pay $236,000 Law School Debt

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Law school students learn how to argue over contracts. But that doesn't necessarily mean they can litigate their way out of a contract to pay their law school loans.

Federal Magistrate Judge Retires; Applications Sought for Replacement

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

For any attorney interested in becoming a federal magistrate judge, the deadline is quickly approaching to apply for the position being vacated by retiring Magistrate Judge Thomas P. Smith.

Alisha Taylor and David Burns

Conn. IP Firm Expansion Includes Former Pratt & Whitney Counsel

By Law Tribune Staff |

The Hartford-based intellectual property firm of Cantor Colburn has added two new attorneys, including a former in-house counsel for Connecticut aircraft engine maker Pratt & Whitney.

Conn. Courts Flooded With Hundreds of Suits Demanding Student Loan Repayments

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A student loan company has been filing hundreds of lawsuits in Connecticut state courts against former students in recent years, and in many cases, the defendants are trying to navigate their way through the debt situation with no help from any attorney.

City Settles With Woman for $66,000 Over Disputed Police Search

By Associated Press |

A Connecticut woman who sued police for using bogus information to get a search warrant for her apartment is receiving $66,000.

Editorial: Trial Lawyers Should Be Students of Juror Biases

Renowned Connecticut plaintiffs trial lawyer Ted Koskoff once wrote that the trial of a lawsuit is a lesson in applied psychology.

Contractor Wins Defense Verdict After Excavator Accident Injures Teen

By Megan Spicer |

Scott Ostrosky's property was the place to be during the summer. A contractor by trade, he would set up an excavator at the edge of a lake in Sandy Hook. Some days, he would let friends climb into the machinery's bucket and then raise them up so they could jump in the lake. Other days, he would attach a hose to the bucket and people would swing from the hose out into the lake.

Patrick Carroll

State Budget Cuts Will Force Big Hike in Probate Fees

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

The state's 54 probate courts won't get any state funding under the recently approved two-year budget, which officials said would necessitate increased fees to cover operational costs.

Editorial: Employment Discrimination Law Should Allow for Punitive Damages

On May 19, the Connecticut Appellate Court ruled in Tomick v. United Parcel Service, 157 Conn. App. 312 (2015), that the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (CFEPA) does not permit a judge or jury to award punitive damages against an employer who has discriminated against an employee.

Alinor Sterling

Supreme Court's Interest Rate Decision Boosts Med-Mal Verdict to $15 Million

By Christian Nolan |

Twenty years after she received a mistaken cancer diagnosis, Michelle DiLieto's long legal process may finally be over.

Dan Krisch

Dan Krisch: 'Serial' Shines Uncomfortably Bright Light on Justice System

By Daniel Krisch |

I am hesitant to "Serial"-ize our court system. Last week, my wife Sophia, brother-in-law Vlad and I joined a couple thousand other avid fans at the Bushnell for a Q&A with Sarah Koenig and Julie Snyder, the host (Koenig) and producer (Snyder) of the wildly popular, addictively engrossing "Serial" podcast.

Judge Bars Fraternity From Using House While Contesting Order to Go Coed

By Megan Spicer |

When it comes to private property belonging to a private organization on a private university campus, who has the final say? When it comes to a fraternity house at Wesleyan University, a judge said, for now, college administrators are the ultimate keepers of the keys.

Pattis-Norm

Norm Pattis: Reckless Email Is Not True Threat Against Judge

By Norm Pattis |

Remind me next time I get a little ticked off about something a judge has done not to send an email to would-be supporters describing how one might sit outside the jurist's home, concealed, and fire a shot into a bedroom.

More Clients Make Monetary Claims Against Former Attorney

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

With more clients of a former New Haven attorney claiming he took their money, officials are planning an audit to try to get a better picture of the scope of the alleged thefts.

Timothy Hollister

After 25 Years, Affordable Housing Lawsuits Still Common in Conn.

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A developer wants to build a 257-unit multi-family residential project in Milford. About 30 percent of it would consist of so-called affordable housing. But the local land use board has denied the application.

John WIlliams

Conn. McDonald's Franchise Hit With LGBT Discrimination Suit

By Megan Spicer |

A McDonald's commercial bills its fast-food franchises as places for food, folks and fun. But at least one employee of a Hamden McDonald's, owned by franchisee Golden Hawk LLC, would dispute the latter, as she claims she was subjected to a hostile work environment because she was gay.

Court Says Transgender Teen's Rights Violated in Prison Transfer

By Associated Press |

Connecticut's second-highest court has ruled that a transgender girl's due process rights were violated last year when she was transferred from the custody of the state's child welfare agency to a state prison, a detention that sparked an outcry from civil liberties advocates.

Jeremy Donnelly

Court Upholds $278,000 Verdict Against Monastery That Falsely Claimed Church Affiliation

By Christian Nolan |

The state Appellate Court has upheld a verdict of more than $278,000 against a religious monastery in Ashford that promoted itself as being affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church when it was not.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: The New World of Outside Investment in Law Firms

By Mark Dubois |

Our prohibition on using equity to raise capital for law firms is premised on the notion that lawyers in thrall of stockholders will be likely to do things and take chances that may disadvantage their clients. I don't buy it.

Attorney Arrested After Alleged Theft From Military Veteran Client

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

An attorney who was acting as a conservator for a military veteran has been arrested and charged with stealing about $68,000 from the now-deceased client by apparently making hundreds of unauthorized payments to himself.

Alice Bruno

Lawmakers Never Voted on Four Superior Court Nominees

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

The legislature didn't take final action on Gov. Dannel Malloy's four most recent Superior Court nominees before the legislative session ended June 3. The governor has said he has re-submitted the names for the legislature's future consideration.

Conn. Evidence Rules Updated To Include Texts, Computer Files and Other Digital Data

By Thomas B. Scheffey |

New Haven Housing Court Judge Steven Ecker talks about how people in his courtroom often try to hand him their cellphones. Not to shoot a selfie or anything like that, but in an attempt to get a text message or other digital data introduced as evidence in their cases.

John Darer

Safety and Security as Part of the New Normal

By John Darer |

It may surprise members of the Connecticut bar, but structured settlement annuities and indexed annuity placements increased in the first quarter of the year, while sales in other annuity segments declined, according to a May report released by Life Insurance Marketing and Research Association (LIMRA).

Martin Jacobson and Paul K. Isaac

Balancing Plaintiffs' Income and Medicare's Interest

By Martin Jacobson & Paul K. Isaac |

As most trial lawyers know, when a personal injury lawsuit settles it is incumbent on the parties to protect Medicare's interests by: (a) repaying any conditional payments advanced by Medicare to pay for treatment related to the occurrence, and (b) taking reasonable good-faith steps to make sure that Medicare is not going to be charged with paying for future treatment related to the occurrence, where the plaintiff was likely compensated for those future medical costs in the settlement.

Jeffrey Cheney

Overlooked Tax Considerations in Structured Settlements

By Jeffrey M. Cheney |

Settlements are typically stressful. Among the various objectives that need to be covered in a settlement, taxes tend to be last on the list of considerations.

Bill Requires Police to Release Detailed Arrest Data

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

The legislature has passed a bill which requires police to release more information to the public about arrests, reversing a 2014 Connecticut Supreme Court decision which limited what police were required to give out while a prosecution is pending.

Kevin Tighe

Town Wants $5 Million Verdict Vacated in Takings Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

This is not your standard eminent domain case where the government takes someone's property to build a highway or some such public purpose. Instead, a developer is claiming that its property was taken by a town through zoning regulations so onerous that they made the property unmarketable.

Kevin Tighe

Town Wants $5 Million Verdict Vacated in Takings Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

This is not your standard eminent domain case where the government takes someone's property to build a highway or some such public purpose. Instead, a developer is claiming that its property was taken by a town through zoning regulations so onerous that they made the property unmarketable.

Robert Peragine

Plaintiff Injured in Five Accidents Wins $300,000

By Christian Nolan |

Attorney Robert Peragine said he had to persuade a jury that his client's injuries stemmed from the accident in question and not four other mishaps.

Rob Harris

Conn. Attorney's Golf Blog Brings Game's Legal Issues to Forefront

By Megan Spicer |

Anyone without a vested interest in the historic game of golf may not be able to comprehend that the world of golf litigation is as vast as the old course at St. Andrews in Scotland.

Rachel Baird

Man Accused of Threatening Conn. Judge Cites New Supreme Court Ruling in Defense

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in which the justices threw out a man's conviction for making threatening comments about his wife on Facebook is already having an impact in Connecticut.

Gideon

Gideon: Legislative Pouting Disrupts Important Drug Law Debates

By Gideon |

In the last month, I have been interviewed by two high school classes. One was at a predominantly white, suburban prep school and the other at a predominantly minority urban high school. At both places, the students weren't interested in how to write a pseudonymous column for a local legal newspaper, but instead they wanted to know what it was like to be a public defender.

Editorial: Conn. Should Hire 'Court Navigators' to Help Pro Ses

In his recent annual report on the New York state judiciary, titled "Access to Justice: Making the Ideal a Reality," Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman called on the New York State Legislature "to pass a joint resolution that makes it unmistakably clear as a matter of policy and principle that low-income New Yorkers facing legal matters concerning the necessities of life are entitled to effective legal assistance in civil proceedings."

George Jepsen

Conn. To Share in $136M Settlement With Bogus Cancer Charities

By Christian Nolan |

Federal Trade Commission, all Fifty States, and the District of Columbia v. Cancer Fund of America: Connecticut and all 49 other states have filed a federal lawsuit against four sham cancer charities and those responsible for their operation.

Robert Simpson

Updated: $4.5 Million Dental Malpractice Verdict May Be Record Setter

By Christian Nolan |

When a tooth becomes infected and inflamed causing pain, a dentist may recommend a root canal. That's what happened when Supriya Sarin went to her dentist, Darryl Simms, of Farmington Family Dentistry.

Conn. Supreme Court Ruling Could Prompt Sentencing Appeals

By Christian Nolan |

The criminal defense bar says that science has shown for decades that the brains of adolescents are not yet fully developed. As such, defense lawyers believe defendants who commit major crimes, such as murder, when they are under 18 are less culpable than adults and have a better chance at rehabilitation.

Pet Memorial Companies Fight Over 'Paws' Name in Conn. IP Dispute

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

Two companies that sell products aimed at comforting people who are grieving over a lost pet are locked in a trademark dispute.

 dental

Root Canal Gone Wrong Leads to $4.5 Million Med-Mal Verdict

By Christian Nolan |

When a tooth becomes infected and inflamed causing pain, a dentist may recommend a root canal. That's what happened when Supriya Sarin went to her dentist, Darryl Simms, of Farmington Family Dentistry.

Norm Pattis: Judges Should Let Excessive-Force Claims Go Forward

By Norm Pattis |

Hard cases, the maxim goes, make bad law. So it is hardly surprising that the Connecticut General Assembly is poised to weigh in on the use of deadly force by police officers with a sloppy piece of legislation. I wonder, really, whether new laws are necessary. And if they are, I harbor doubts about the bill unanimously passed by the Senate.

Gideon

Gideon: Pouting, Posturing Disrupts Important Drug Law Debates

In the last month, I have been interviewed by two high school classes. One was at a predominantly white, suburban prep school and the other at a predominantly minority urban high school. At both places, the students weren't interested in how to write a pseudonymous column for a local legal newspaper, but instead wanted to know what it was like to be a public defender.

Juvenile Sentencing Bill Guarantees Parole Hearings

By Christian Nolan |

The General Assembly has passed legislation that would prevent courts from sentencing juveniles to life sentences without the possibility of a parole hearing.

An MGM Grand employee polishes slot machines at the MGM Grand at Foxwoods Resort Casino.

High-Stakes Gamblers Accused of Cheating Lose $3 Million Suit Against Foxwoods

By Associated Press |

Three gamblers from China, including a woman known as the "Queen of Sorts" for her card-monitoring skills, have lost a legal challenge to reclaim nearly $3 million in winnings and deposits they say were kept by Foxwoods Resort Casino based on false cheating allegations.

Dubois-Mark

Mark Dubois: Another Lawyer Engages In Crime of Opportunity

By Mark Dubois |

The rules should be amended to require all lawyers' fiduciary accounts to be registered with the Statewide Grievance Committee. Probate judges should start demanding bonds from fiduciaries and routinely auditing accounts under their supervision.

Conn. Judges Erasing Marijuana Convictions at High Rate

By Associated Press |

Connecticut judges have granted more than 80 percent of requests to erase marijuana possession convictions since the state decriminalized small amounts of pot in 2011, state Judicial Branch records show.

Peter Facinelli

'Twilight' Star Accused of Contract Breach by Conn. Producer

By Michelle Tuccitto Sullo |

An actor famous for his role in the popular "Twilight" series of movies is being sued in federal court, where he faces claims of breach of contract and unfair trade practices for allegedly not properly compensating a Connecticut-based business partner.

Law Firm 3.0: Information Changing Business Models

By Hank Grezlak and Gina Passarella |

The standard law firm model that has been in effect for the better part of the last 20 years is becoming less viable and the way law firms are run is undergoing a subtle, yet significant change, driven largely by information.

Firms Must Not Shirk Hacking Precautions

By Joshua Gold |

Law firm data include secrets, and this reality makes lawyers targets.