A court can award one party a greater amount from the net proceeds of sale of a marital asset, to recognize that the party's financial contributions were greater during the marriage. The parties were married in July 1999 and have no minor children together. It was the second marriage for each. The wife's adult child lived with them and paid rent. Allegedly, the parties fought about finances, with the wife willing to live a simple lifestyle to avoid debt, and the husband tolerant of debt to finance a more lavish lifestyle. Apparently, the wife viewed the husband as profligate, and he considered the wife penurious. Currently, the plaintiff wife earns $548 net per week at Hartford Hospital and also receives $574 net per week from her late husband's pension. The wife owes $2,000 in credit card debt and owes her attorney $11,000. The defendant husband earns $614 net per week, working as a youth services officer at the Department of Children and Families. The husband owes $18,100 in credit card debt and $10,000 to the State Employee Credit Union. The court ordered the parties to sell the marital residence and awarded the wife the first $20,000 of the net proceeds of sale, because her financial contributions were greater during the marriage. The court ordered the parties to divide equally the remainder. The court did not award alimony. The court awarded each party accounts and investments. The husband is entitled to any workers' compensation award he receives. The court ordered the parties to hold each other harmless from debt. The court awarded the wife the 2006 Acura and the husband the 1998 Acura.

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