A court can award the recipient of support a "safe harbor," to earn up to a certain amount per year, without earnings constituting a basis to modify alimony and child support. The parties married in January 1994 and have three children. The defendant husband worked at a New York law firm and then worked as general counsel for a family business. The husband became involved in various business ventures and, when he sold his interests, he received about $14 million. In 2010, the plaintiff wife realized that the parties were experiencing financial difficulty. In 2012, the parties ceased paying the mortgage. The minor children are recipients of State of Connecticut Husky medical assistance. The husband, who recently started a new business venture, currently earns $5,000 gross per month. The plaintiff wife, who had been working as a homemaker, currently earns $550 gross per week, as a coordinator at a store. The court awarded the wife alimony and child support of $1,750 per month or 40 percent of the husband's gross income, whichever is greater, until the wife's death, marriage, cohabitation or May 31, 2016, whichever takes place first. The court awarded the wife alimony and child support of $1,500 per month or 35 percent of the husband's gross income, whichever is greater, until May 31, 2026. The court awarded the wife alimony and child support of $1,350 per month or 25 percent of the husband's gross income, whichever is greater, until May 31, 2028. The court awarded the wife a safe harbor, to earn up to $50,000 gross per year, without the wife's earnings constituting a basis to modify alimony and child support. The court awarded the wife exclusive possession of the marital residence, until a foreclosure or a short sale takes place. The husband shall be solely responsible for any deficiency from foreclosure or a short sale. The court awarded each party bank accounts and investments.

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